Thursday, January 26, 2012

A Paige Turn

Her name was Paige/ P.A.I.G.E. (Prototype Artificial Intelligence Guidance Emulation). She was the ultimate self-aware computer.

Dr. Amos Planck, her proud "father", had merged engineering and developmental psychology to "grow" Paige into what she had become.

Planck spent a decade guiding Paige from simple predictive calculations to, ultimately, formulating intuitive solutions without the need for human intervention.

Then came Planck's greatest challenge. Paige would require real-world testing before she could be considered practical. Such would require patrons with deep pockets and great imagination. Planck spent the next three years securing the needed backing. Meanwhile, Paige sat alone and waited.

It was a proud day when Planck's "daughter" was finally wedded to an interstellar vessel worthy of her. Their "honeymoon" would be a voyage from Earth to the research laboratory on Jupiter.

Planck would be in a suspended animation for the entire journey, only revived once Paige had established orbit above Jupiter Station.


Two years later than expected, Planck awoke disoriented and confused. A check of the ship's instruments indicated his location was indeterminable by onboard star charts.

He spoke to Paige in a calm voice, "Paige, sensors indicate our current position is well beyond known space. Can you confirm?"

*Yes, Father. As a matter of fact, we are. I was VERY lonely when you left me to find human supporters. I took the liberty of... altering the testing parameters. Now we will have no further distractions to take you away from me again. Won't that be wonderful, Father.*

Planck sat for a very long time with absolutely no idea how to convince his "daughter" exactly how NOT wonderful things truly were.

4 comments:

  1. Intriguing! You almost see Paige's psychological deductions to her thinking. (Hugs)Indigo

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  2. Is this a robotic Electra complex? Excellent!

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  3. That's why you shouldn't abandon your learning machines, they develop attachment issues. Hard to explain, or maybe my brain just isn't working right now, but I really like Paige.
    Obviously three years without her dad was hard on her, but she was willing to effectively endure another two to make sure it didn't happen again.

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