Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Monday Mixer Winners, Week 10


Every week for Monday Mixer, I trot out another nine words from my extensive vocabulary and challenge writers to come forth and work them into exceptional stories of minimal length and every week I am suitably amazed by the excellent contributions that I receive. It is your stories that make this all possible and, as the challenge gains popularity, I hope it will attract new readers to your wonderfully talented efforts. So let's see who garners the badges this week:




Jeff Xilon for his untitled story. While I am familiar with his work from other flash fiction challenges, Jeff is a newcomer to the Monday Mixer and delivers admirably. A flash piece done entirely in dialogue is especially challenging to pull off and this was skillfully managed, indeed. It had a gritty, Sam Spade quality that was most entertaining. I look forward to seeing future offerings from Jeff.

Kayla for her untitled story.  This story had a saucy Desperate Housewives quality that made it a great read. It incorporated an undercurrent of potentiality for things to happen that made for interesting conjecture. If not for a misspelling of a prompt word, this would have been a strong contender for a higher mention.





Ruth Long for her story Savior Faire.  This story had such a delightful romantic feel to it. Combining some obvious baking knowledge with a good story flow and palpable descriptions I could almost see and feel, it was a pleasurable read. While it only incorporated three of the possible prompt words, they fit so seamlessly into the tale as to be barely recognized as such. They were an aspect of the overall product while not becoming the focus. 



Snellopy for his untitled story. This tale had such a wonderful flow to it, I was borne along down the mentioned rill from beginning to end and left wanting more. He not only managed to work in seven very disparate words but to make it seem as if there were no better words possible than those chosen to tell this homey, magical story. This was a textbook study in how to tell a story elegantly.


Lisa Shambrook for her story To Protect.  I have long known of Lisa's ability to create some truly entertaining short fiction, but she definitely brought her "A" game to the challenge this week. The goal of any flash fiction piece is to take a tale from beginning to end in a very short number of words. It requires proficiency, skill and significant forethought. In this entry, Lisa has presented a deep, rich story that not only succeeds as a stand-alone project but also presents the potential for it to be merely the premise or backdrop for something much bigger and more involved. Any number of successful books have started from such beginnings. This has that potential.


Please bear in mind my decisions are entirely subjective and may not find favor or agreement with all, but decisions are like that. For those writers not mentioned, no slight is intended and I hope next week will find you back for more.

Here is the link to view and read all of the truly inspired offerings for this week.  Please show a little Monday Mixer love and make a point of clicking on each entry and checking them out. Remember, each link clicked on takes you directly to that particular writer's page and provides them blog traffic and, hopefully, feedback to encourage them to come out & play next week.




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